ASL and Your Reading Program…

When learning a new developmental skill or a basic academic subject like reading, writing, or math, children have to first be able to focus or attend to what they are learning.  Helping children learn to pay attention and focus are important factors in school readiness.   Once they get to Kindergarten they will need these skills to learn.  Therefore, the question becomes how as early childhood educators and families can we help young children in developing their attention span?

It is important to understand the brain is a pattern seeking organ.  Therefore in order for young children to attend to their environment they have to be able to predict what will happen next, this is where daily routines are so important.  Creating morning routines or evening routines helps develop attention skills.

The brain also likes novelty; children will pay attention and gravitate towards new materials, toys, and centers/activities in their environment. Rotating toys and providing a variety of activities from time to time will help children develop skills to observe, attend, and will keep them in engaged.

At this point we like to use the vocabulary of American Sign Language (ASL) to keep children engaged. There are lots of signs you can use (while continuing to speak) to keep them involved with you, which also helps with the brain development. Signs like “apple”, “book”, “shoes”, “ball”, etc. A great resource we recommend is http://aslpro.com to find lots of ASL words and a visual on how the signs are made.

We also know from research by Abraham Maslow, that in order for children to focus they need to have their basic needs met.  Basic needs are things such as food, shelter, and feeling safe.  For instance, if a child comes to school without eating breakfast this child will have a harder time focusing and learning until lunch time.   Children also need to form bonds with the adults in their lives in order to have a sense of security and learn in their environment.  Activities such as giving a child a high-five, reading a story, singing, signing “I Love You!” and playing with the child leads to forming a strong bond.

The following videos will give you lots of ideas on how to incorporate signs into your daily routines.

Other things we can do to support attention are:

  • Using sign language, such as using the word ‘focus’ to help children remember to pay attention
  • Reading stories, while highlighting words in ASL
  • Music and Movement  especially linking to following directions like Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes
  • Helping children define boundaries by using “Brain Mats”
  • Keeping activities short than building up the time
  • Planning activities that are fun and engaging
  • Helping children learn strategies to focus by modeling, role playing, or discussing the best ways to focus and learn

Are you looking for even more activities to integrate ASL?  We have TONS.  Check out our teacher resource sites filled with wonderful ASL resources to use in your program, visit us at Teachers Pay Teachers.  Also, come join the fun and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.

Are you looking to learn more ASL?  Check out the Sprouting New Beginnings YouTube site and feel free to join the fun and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.  Or find us on one of our teacher resource stores.  Please visit Teachers Pay Teachers and have fun incorporating ASL into your reading program!

We love sharing the gift of ASL with others.

Happy Signing II

 

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Nursery Rhymes and Signing with ASL

Integrating Nursery Rhymes into your literacy program is a great way to support the brain with patterns and rhyming, which enhances children’s memory capacity.  As a college professor, I am privileged to work with wonderful individuals working in early childhood.  During class sessions, we have fantastic discussions about child development, developmentally appropriate practices, and how to help children with challenging behaviors. My students are hungry for information and knowledge that will enhance their abilities and skills as teachers.  

ASL Word Card

One strategy that we always talk about time and time again is using American Sign Language (ASL).  This incredibly versatile tool promotes language and communication skills, as well as social-emotional skills.  PLUS, when you integrate it into songs, nursery rhymes, and stories you are supporting early literacy skills. Supporting early literacy skills in early child care provides children with a strong foundation to be lifelong learners and we all know the power of nursery rhymes and their benefits for developing phonological awareness and exposing children to the rhythm of language.  Enhancing children’s memory capacity supports their working memory which in turn supports them in holding information long term as well as supports them in learning concepts like math and reading.

Nursery RhymesDid you know nursery rhymes are also great for other cognitive abilities like sequencing?  Since nursery rhymes have a beginning, middle, and end that can be recalled with ease they support the developmental skill of sequencing which in turn supports math skills. BUT wait, they are also excellent for physical development.  Reciting nursery rhymes gives the oral muscles a workout.
PLUS, having children act them out and integrating ASL gets their whole bodies involved.   It is no wonder we love integrating ASL and nursery rhymes into early child care programs.  Finding tools and resources that support the whole child, every child, like nursery rhymes and ASL create intentional and meaningful experiences for children.  Which supports the love of learning for young children.  

Starting this month we are going to provide you samples of our popular ASL resources… so this month we would like to give you a sample of Nursery Rhymes for Signing. This Three Nursery Rhymes for Signing Sample includes Itsy Bitsy Spider, Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star and Hey Diddle, Diddle.  We hope you enjoy our newest resource and for a full version, visit our TPT store to get our Nursery Rhymes for Signing and don’t forget about our other popular resource, Songs for Signing too… this is another great tool for any classroom.

Remember as you are integrating ASL the four most important things to remember are:

1. Be Consistent
2. Repeat, Repeat, Repeat
3. Model, Model, Model – even use ASL with other adults, show the children what you want from them and that this is a natural way of communicating
4. Above all, have FUN!

Want more?  Check out the Sprouting New Beginnings YouTube site and feel free to join the fun and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest. We love sharing the gift of ASL with others.

Happy Signing II

Ringing in the New Year!

Happy New Year 2017!

As we ring in the New Year and consider what 2017 holds for us we want to take a moment to thank each and everyone one of you for your involvement with us.  We are truly blessed to a part of your lives and have you a part of ours.  

In this blog, we want to discuss supporting young children with setting goals and practicing self-help skills. 

Supporting Young Children with Setting Goals

It is important to expose young children to the idea of setting goals for themselves.  Then discussing and planning with young children how they may reach the goal they set.   The New Year and talking about New Year Resolutions is a great way to introduce this idea of goal setting in the classroom or as a family in the home.  It is important to model first for selecting a goal for yourself and discussing with the children how you are planning to achieve that goal.   Is it a goal that will take some time to achieve or is it a goal that will take no time at all to achieve?  What do you need to achieve this goal?   We have created a free chart to help you with brainstorming storm ideas for goals with the children.  My New Years Resolution Template

Then have the children individual draw and write what their News Resolution maybe on a paper titled: My New Year’s Resolution and completes the sentence My New Year’s Resolution is …

For families,  you can create a New Year’s Resolution tree and have each family member write or draw their own New Year’s Resolution to hang on the tree.   You may also want to discuss goals for the family to work towards together compared to goals just for each member of the family. 

HelpPracticing Self-Help Skills and Introducing New Signs

The weather is finally changing and it is time for our winter jackets, mittens, and hats.  This wonderful opportunity to teach the signs for clothes and having young children practice self-help skills that lead to developing fine motor skills such as:

  • Zipping
  • Buttoning
  • Dressing ourselves to keep warm

It is also fun to take pictures of your little ones in their winter clothes and create a book or use for a bulletin board display don’t forget to label with sign language and use the Help sign to ask if they do need help.

Top 10 Winter Activities for Families 

  • Cuddle and read under a warm blanket or near a cozy fire.
  • Make hot chocolate, don’t forget the marshmallows.
  • Go up north and play in the snow.
  • Create a snowman using construction paper and other materials.
  • Make a paper snowflake.
  • Make a valentine for someone special.
  • Have a family game night.
  • Bake some warm, delicious cookies
  • Pop some popcorn and gather the together for a fun family movie night.
  • Build a fort inside with blankets and pillows. 

Don’t forget to use some fun Winter signs too when doing the above activities:Love

  • Winter
  • Cold
  • Cookie
  • Snow
  • Coat
  • Shoes
  • Jacket
  • Pants
  • Mitten
  • Love
  • Fun

Happy Signing II

 

 

 

 

Still looking for more for your classroom or home?   We have created lots of helpful resources for you. Visit one of our stores at Teachers Pay Teachers or Teacher’s Notebook.  Also, come join the fun and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.

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ASL Brings the Language Alive

BLOG

1. A regularly updated website or web page, typically one run by an individual or small group, that is written in an informal or conversational style.

We’re glad you’re part of our BLOG family. As you know Sprouting New Beginnings specializes on posting ideas on how to incorporate American Sign Language (ASL, which is a gift from the deaf) into your lives and programs.

ASL promotes school readiness and success by developing early communication, brain development and literacy… so thank you for being one of our peeps! We hope you help us pass on the message too!

So for today we would like to talk about the high correlation between vocabulary size at age three and reading test scores at age nine.

It is not surprising to know that ASL enhances early literacy skills by supporting oral language development and increasing vocabulary, spelling, and reading skills.  Through increase student engagement during story time and intentionally teaching vocabulary words using ASL, students have an increased opportunity to work with language and use it in a variety ways. 

Not Just for Prevebal II

Research shows that ASL enhances pre-literacy skills and helps build the bridge of communication with pre-verbal children.  An effective intervention model for developing pre-literacy skills ASL is easily incorporated into all aspects of language development. 

We suggest using it during story time at home or in the classroom to highlight vocabulary words in the story, as well as to label, describe, and categorize words.Classroom LabelsSongs & Chants for Signing

Our philosophy is that using ASL as a strategy to support language development is beneficial not only for communication and literacy skills but also for all other learning domains; cognitive, motor, adaptive, social and emotional. 

ASL, being the third largest language in the United States, is easily incorporated into the daily routines of children.  It offers children the ability to build the bridge of communication with their caregivers while promoting a strong literacy foundation for their future.  Incorporating ASL into your daily home activities or literacy curriculum enhances children’s connections to language, reading, writing, and speaking.

Ultimately, it brings language a live!

Now for our commercial break…

A fun way to support oral language development is to using songs and chants.  This supports children developing their phonemic
awareness and introduces new vocabulary.  Children have fun playing with the language while building fine motor skills as they
sign, sing, and chant.  We’ve put together a collection of our favorite songs and chants for you. This can be found at one of our
teacher resource stores, please visit Teachers Pay Teachers and have fun incorporating ASL into your reading program!

TipFollow us on TpT to find all of our resources, plus we have regular sales for you to stock up on all those wonderful
resources we mention in our BLOG!  And bring your language alive!

Are you looking to learn more ASL?  Check out the Sprouting New Beginnings YouTube site and feel free to join the fun and
follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.  We love sharing the gift of ASL with others.

Happy Signing II

Keeping Your Relationship Close

As our babies get older they start to pull away and those little ones don’t want to snuggle with us anymore, which just pull on our heart strings.  To keep that relationship close, start routines that build connections with your children. We compiled some fun ways to support the developing child.  They are not in any particular order but all of them will have benefits beyond the immediate and they are excellent ways to support the whole child, every child.

1. Read! One of our favorites! Snuggle up together and enjoy a good story. Children crave repetition of songs and stories because it is necessary for their development. (Guilmartin & Levinowitz, 2003) So be prepared to read that book over and over again. You are creating wonderful experiences that will last a life time for your child.  See #4 for a great tip to use when you read too.

2. Sing! We also love singing traditional finger play tunes and nursery rhymes as well as favorite songs from the radio. According to New Directions Institute, listening to music decreases stress, activates both sides of the brain, and increases learning capacity.

3. Play! Let them take the lead…this is a great way to find out what interests your child. Self-esteem is the single greatest predictor of success in school (Brooks, 1990). It is built when a child is invited to sing, move, or play in a group, and feels membership and contribution to group effort. (Snyder, 1997).

4. Sign! Use American Sign Language (ASL).  This supports communication development, which increases opportunities to bond by creating experiences that nurture and are warm and responsive to promote healthy brain development. The visual components of sign language create “an increase of brain activity by engaging the visual cortex and presenting an additional language to the young learner.” (Daniels, 2001) We suggest using ASL with infants as early as 6 months of age and continuing through their lives.  Don’t forget to speak your words too as this helps with those communication skills and use it while reading.  It’s fun to sign some of the words… it brings the story alive!

5. Laugh! Having a sense of humor and sharing it with your children is critical to a happy life and happy parenting. “A day without laughter is a day wasted.” ~ Charlie Chaplin  Knock, Knock jokes can be the best!!

6. Dance! It is great for exercise AND a healthy brain. Research done with children shows that movement stimulates brain development and draws on the multiple intelligence. (Kim, 1995)  We like putting on all that old time music… you know, from the 60’s, 70’s, 80’s or even the 90’s!!

7. Write a Love note!  You can leave them on their bedroom doors, in their lunch boxes, in the pockets of their coats, on the kitchen table, or anywhere that is special to you.  We don’t know anyone who doesn’t like to receive a love note!!

8. Creating specific family traditions like Friday night game night. Have a family meeting and find out what tradition everyone would like to begin, choose a day, and let the FUN begin!

9. Family Fun Dayswe LOVE Saturdays, check out our Family Fun Tips on Facebook every Saturday for ideas to engage the family.

10. Share special moments together. “It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.”
~Antoine de Saint Exupery.

Remember, your children will remember the fun times they had with you… enriching their relationships will stay with them for a life-time!

LovePlay

 

Happy Signing II

Self-Concept, Self-Esteem and Self-Worth

As parents and an early childhood educators we know it is incredibly important to provide young children with lots of encouragement in order to build their self-concept, self-esteem, and self-worth.  However, at times this can be a challenging task in the middle of the hustle and bustle of daily life.  Having a few tricks, reminders, and tips around the house or classroom help us remember to focus on the positive rather than the negative.  Children like adults love to be acknowledged for what they are doing right or what is working.  Encouraging words are great motivators for young children, some of our favorites are:

  • You’re terrific
  • You’re wonderful
  • Fantastic job
  • Thanks for showing respect
  • You are responsible
  • What a good choice
  • Nice sharing

Remember to be specific and let the child know exactly what they did that was so great.  For instance, “I really like the good choice you made to share.”  Or, “What a great problem solver you are!”  

We also love bringing in American Sign Language for a visual cue.  It is a fun way to encourage young children in a spontaneous manner even when they are across the room from you.

Good & Thank You

In many schools young children are learning about good character traits and a popular program being used is Character Counts.  On this website there are parent and teacher resources.  This is a great program to help support the social-emotional development of young children.  Plus you can sing the six pillars of character:

  • Trustworthiness – Being honest, telling the truth, keeping promises and being loyal so people can trust you.
  • Respect – Showing others that they are valued for who they are.  It means treating others the way you want to be treated.  A respectful person is polite, does not use hurtful language and never uses violence.
  • Responsibility – Doing what you are supposed to do.  Responsible people think ahead, set reasonable goals, control their tempers and always do their best.
  • Fairness – Playing by the rules, taking turns, sharing, and listening.
  • Caring – Being kind, helpful and generous to everyone.  Caring people care how others feel and they are charitable and forgiving.  They do good deeds without the thought of reward.
  • Citizenship – Doing your share to help your family and your community be a better place.  Good Citizens are good neighbors.  They cooperate with others, obey laws and rules, protect the environment, and respect the authority of parents, teachers and others.

Another great resource for supporting social-emotional development in young children is Conscious Discipline. Being a positive and healthy role model for children is essential for raising healthy, self-confident, self-motivated, and high self-esteem adults.  

Are you looking for even more activities and resources to integrate ASL into your program? We have TONS for you!! Check out our teacher resource sites, which are filled with wonderful ASL resources to use in your program.  Visit us on Teachers Pay Teachers, Syllabuy or Teacher’s Notebook.  Also, come join the fun and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.  

We love sharing the gift of ASL with others.

Happy Signing II

The Power of Daily Routines

Sprouting New Beginnings understands balancing life’s aspects.  Between raising young children and teaching young children our hands are always busy.  A consistent daily routine allows our children the ability to predict what will come next in their day.  This essential addition in our lives supports early brain development and social-emotional development in our growing children.IMG_1947

When young children know what to expect next they are better able to focus their attention and are able to learn, thus increasing abilities such as narrative skills, sequencing skills, and patterning skills.  Encouraging children to describe things and events provides them with opportunities to problem solve, increase communication, and build self-reliance.  When young children are learning about daily routines it is helpful to create a picture chart of their daily schedule and all the actions that must be accomplished. Picture charts are a wonderful communication and visual tool to use with young children.  Picture charts allow young children to sequence events throughout their day and brings in math by exploring ordinal numbers such as what comes 1st, 2nd, and 3rd.  Families will also find picture charts beneficial at home for morning routines and/or bedtime routines.

Creating daily routines and using picture charts are a great way to promote organization and time management skills, support positive guidance, and to direct a child if they are off task.  Picture charts provide an opportunity for children to learn self-help skills by asking them what they need to be doing or what will come next and allowing them to problem solve by referring to the daily routine chart.      

You can use a kit or create your own Routine Chart.

IMG_1948

To make your own chart is easy, all you need is the following:

Creating Daily Routine Picture Charts

  • Markers
  • Construction Paper or Tag Board
  • Pictures from clipart or photos of the child performing the daily task
  • Glue, Tape, Magnet strips, and or Velcro
  • May want to laminate
  • Pocket Chart or other tools to hang up for child to use

First order the pictures in the correct sequence 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc. on your tag-board or construction paper.  Then label the event on your chart next to or underneath the picture.   Last, display chart in a visible area so that children can refer back to the chart anytime.  You can extend this activity by applying sign language and teaching the signs for each routine.  You may also want to incorporate sign language cards with in your chart.

Are you looking to learn more ASL?  Check out the Sprouting New Beginnings YouTube site and feel free to join the fun and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.  Or find us on one of our teacher resource stores.  Please visit Teachers Pay Teachers, Syllabuy or Teacher’s Notebook and have fun incorporating ASL into your reading program!

Happy Signing II

Supporting Early Brain Development and Learning

When learning a new developmental skill or a basic academic subject like reading, writing, or math, children have to first be able to focus or attend to what they are learning.  Helping children learn to pay attention and focus are important factors in school readiness.   Once they get to Kindergarten they will need these skills to learn.  Therefore, the question becomes how as early childhood educators and families can we help young children in developing their attention span?

It is important to understand the brain is a pattern seeking organ.  Therefore in order for young children to attend to their environment they have to be able to predict what will happen next, this is where daily routines are so important.  Creating morning routines or evening routines helps develop attention skills.

The brain also likes novelty; children will pay attention and gravitate towards new materials, toys, and centers/activities in their environment. Rotating toys and providing a variety of activities from time to time will help children develop skills to observe, attend, and will keep them in engaged.

At this point we like to use the vocabulary of American Sign Language (ASL) to keep children engaged. There are lots of signs you can use (while continuing to speak) to keep them involved with you, which also helps with the brain development. Signs like “apple”, “book”, “shoes”, “ball”, etc. A great resource we recommend is http://aslpro.com to find lots of ASL words and a visual on how the signs are made.

We also know from research by Abraham Maslow, that in order for children to focus they need to have their basic needs met.  Basic needs are things such as food, shelter, and feeling safe.  For instance, if a child comes to school without eating breakfast this child will have a harder time focusing and learning until lunch time.   Children also need to form bonds with the adults in their lives in order to have a sense of security and learn in their environment.  Activities such as giving a child a high-five, reading a story, singing, signing “I Love You!” and playing with the child leads to forming a strong bond.

The following videos will give you lots of ideas on how to incorporate signs into your daily routines.

Other things we can do to support attention are:

  • Using sign language, such as using the word ‘focus’ to help children remember to pay attention
  • Reading stories, while highlighting words in ASL
  • Music and Movement  especially linking to following directions like Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes
  • Helping children define boundaries by using “Brain Mats”
  • Keeping activities short than building up the time
  • Planning activities that are fun and engaging
  • Helping children learn strategies to focus by modeling, role playing, or discussing the best ways to focus and learn

Are you looking for even more activities to integrate ASL?  We have TONS.  Check out our teacher resource sites filled with wonderful ASL resources to use in your program, visit us on Teachers Pay Teachers, Teachers Notebook, or Syllabuy.  Also, come join the fun and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.

Are you looking to learn more ASL?  Check out the Sprouting New Beginnings YouTube site and feel free to join the fun and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.  Or find us on one of our teacher resource stores.  Please visit Teachers Pay Teachers, Syllabuy or Teacher’s Notebook and have fun incorporating ASL into your reading program!

We love sharing the gift of ASL with others.

Happy Signing II

Supporting Self-Regulation with ASL

brain_developmentWe live in an amazing time of information, research, and knowledge.  Through early brain development research we are learning more about the brain at work.  We know that the brain is the least developed organ at birth and that 90% of the brain is wired up in the first 3-years of life.  That is 90% of our brains… Wired by 3-years old!!!

We also know that early experiences are critical to a child’s development and that structure and routine are essential to a healthy developing brain.  This research supports all the reasons why we encourage professionals and families to use American Sign Language (ASL).  The benefits are limitless!

BUT, did you know that ASL also supports self-regulation?  Through the continued research on the brain the early childhood field is learning even more about the brain at work.  We now are learning how the brain maps and creates meaning, stores information, learns, and the importance of executive functioning.  Executive functioning is the area of the brain where self-regulation occurs, our working memory is, and our ability to focus and attend.  Self-regulation is the ability to control your impulses, act in your best interest, and make choices that are mindful, intentional, and thoughtful.  

Brain

SO, how does ASL support self-regulation you might ask?   Through providing a tool for children to get their basic physical and emotional needs met.  When children as young as 6-months of age learn ASL they also learn to notice their needs whether those needs are physical, like being hungry, thirsty, or sleepy.  Or, whether those needs are emotional like feeling secure and loved.  Then through signing they ask for what they need.  Children’s brains are actively wired for communication at 6-months of age so their ability to communicate depends on the environment they are in.  If it is an environment that uses ASL they learn quickly to communicate their physical needs and as they grow and develop they learn to express their emotional needs with ease.

Funny story… One time I was in the laundry room and my 2-year old son who had been singing since he was 9-months old stomped in and said and signed, “Mommy, I am MAD at you!”  Then stomped away.  Instead of yelling, screaming, throwing a temper tantrum, or worse hitting me he was able to communicate with his words how he felt.  I was able to support him and help him through this feeling to find a resolution without the drama.  This by far is a healthier and more positive way to teach child how to handle their emotions.  

Children at the age of 2 start feeling emotions, however unless we label them and build their vocabulary they do not understand their feelings.  It is essential to label and notice when a child is having a strong feeling.  You can do this while they are expressing that feeling, or by more pro-active ways like reading stories about emotions, creating emotion books, playing games with emotions, or singing songs.

We love singing the song, “If You Happy and You Know It” while integrating ASL and other emotions.  We provided you this fun ASL resource to use at home or in the classroom, so feel free to download and keep!  It has the words to the song plus some recommended signs to use too!

Do you want to learn more?  Contact us and set up an in-person training or webinar for your group.  OR pick up a copy of our Sign, Read and Play: The School Readiness Collection book for 10 wonderful lessons designed around popular children’s stories to support children’s school readiness skills.  Our Sign, Read, & Play ~ The School Readiness Collection can be found on Amazon, Teacher’s Pay Teacher’s, Syllabuy, and Teacher’s Notebook.

Happy Signing II

 

 

 

 

 

ASL for Positive Guidance

Through years of action research we’ve learned that American Sign Language (ASL) is not only a great strategy for language and literacy development, but it is also a FANTASTIC tool in supporting positive guidance with young children.  We know that children learn best through positive models and a loving, positive, and emotionally stable environment.  Creating healthy and emotionally positive environments with safe boundaries and limits provides children with opportunities to practice, learn, and develop their social-emotional skills.   Developing positive social-emotional skills prepares children for lifelong success.  Having school readiness indicators such as self-awareness, interpersonal awareness, self-expression, communication, listening skills, and group cooperation are just a few skills children today need to have in order to be school ready.  So, how do we support those skills?

We like supporting them through the use of ASL.  Teaching children about their emotions and how to get their basic needs met, both physical and emotional are keys to supporting these important developmental skills.  There is a variety of opportune times to integrate ASL into your program and daily routines.  You can integrate them during transitions, during play time, academic time, story time, and even during meal times.  Children are constantly developing social-emotional skills, so don’t miss those teachable moments. 

In our programs and resources we teach children and professionals how to use ASL to enhance children’s communication skills. 

We teach words like:

  • Please
  • Thank you
  • You’re Welcome
  • Share
  • Stop
  • Go
  • Wait
  • And labeling children’s emotions

When a child is feeling mad or frustrated it provides a wonderful teachable moment to notice how the child is feeling and name that feeling for them using a tandem approach of speech and sign.  Through this approach children learn ways to express their emotions in a healthy, positive manner.  We also encourage professionals to model ASL and label their personal feelings when they feel happy, sad, frustrated, or even mad or bring these conversations into story time by choosing a book where the character feels these emotions.  Explaining what makes them feel this way and how they plan to solve this feeling helps children learn a variety of coping skills that support the necessary school readiness skills.  Think if we had a world of children that had problem solving skills, self-regulation, and the ability to communicate when they were frustrated…what a positive and healthy world we would live in.

SRP Book CoverDo you want to learn more?  Contact us and set up an in-person training or webinar for your group.  OR pick up a copy of our Sign, Read and Play: The School Readiness Collection book for 10 wonderful lessons designed around popular children’s stories to support children’s school readiness skills.  Our Sign, Read, & Play ~ The School Readiness Collection can be found on Amazon, Teacher’s Pay Teacher’s, Syllabuy, and Teacher’s Notebook

Happy Signing II